Ctenanthe Plant

Ctenanthe Plant. Listed bellow are the varieties that are being cultivated around the world. These three plants belong to the marantaceae family also known as the arrowroot family.

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Common names are bamburanta and never never plant and ctenanthe is a part of the maranta family which include, care. They are found in tropical regions, in south america. A ‘cult’ interior plant during the 60’s and 70s, this plant is a little trickier to track down these days.

Its white flowers are borne on short spikes.

Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and. This species grows to about 18 inches tall with elliptical leaves that have a green and creamy yellow pattern and pale green undersides; But, it is important to note while the plant is commonly referred to as the calathea setosa in many stores, it is actually a member of the ctenanthe genus.

Its leaf petioles are hairy.

Stagnation of water is unacceptable, as well as overdrying of the soil. Ctenanthe oppenheimiana is a striking plant in the 'prayer plant', or marantaceae family. Houseplant woody plant leaf characteristics:

It has striped dark green and silver/ grey leaves are purple on their undersides, elliptic with entire margins, up t0 45cm long and 10cm across.

Water thoroughly once the top of the soil feels dry. They are found in tropical regions, in south america. Ctenanthe lubbersiana ’variegata’ has a finer tracery of golden venation through the leaves.

Ctenanthe oppenheimiana ‘tricolor’ water requirements for the never never plant.

These three plants belong to the marantaceae family also known as the arrowroot family. Some of the most popular varieties are discussed below. Arrowroot comes from the starch found in the plants edible rhizome.

A ‘cult’ interior plant during the 60’s and 70s, this plant is a little trickier to track down these days.

It is subtle and sophisticated. Like many tropical indoor plants, your ctenanthe prefers a spot with ample humidity. Thus, its actual name is actually ctenanthe setosa.

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